About the Daughters of D.I.G. (DOD) Project

Daughters of D.I.G.—Developing Intelligent Girls—is an Oakland-based QTPOC tribe, dedicated to passing on the art of digging for knowledge of self through a healing and transformative creative process.

Currently curated by creative Lexx Valdez (lexxdigs.com) and artist/healer Erricka Lewis (thisblackdaffodil.tumblr.com).

Contributing curators:
Devoya Mayo (devoya.tumblr.com) + Valerie Scott (chiefofaffections.tumblr.com)

Founded by Lexx Valdez and Devoya Mayo of thehappyblackgirl.com in 2008 as Daughters of Dilla.

Our message is inspired by the beat of J.Dilla:
"Don't Sell Yourself to Fall in Love"

lexxdigs:

Issue No. 5: Transatlantic Jazz // Design by Sweden10

Letter from the Editor
The issue of lineage always tends to come up when discussing music. Who played this lick first, where did that technique emerge from, who does he sound like, where does her sound come from. Yet, we tend to have a short term memory when tracing the lineage. Moreover, in America, we also seem to talk about lineage within a geographically small sphere of influence.
Despite the fact that America is a melting pot of cultures, those cultures maintain their own roots and histories scattered throughout the world. One of the largest influences represented in the music we love here at the Revivalist are the various African cultures brought over as early as 1526 as a result of the institutions of slavery. With their influence, jazz, hip-hop, R&B, pop, and many other types of music emerged throughout the Americas, later spreading all over the world.
In Africa, music is closely related to language and communication. With many African languages being tonal, the relationship becomes much closer than the widespread idea of adapting language to music. Music is in fact language. While modern musicians focus a good deal of the rhythms that came from African descent, it is also the melodies and harmonies, the communicative spirit, and the creativity which we seek to explore at the Revivalist.
Throughout these next 2 months we will explore a wide-range of topics from all over the African continent and world to discuss the historical applications, the modern scene, and the wide-ranging influence that gave the basis for the vernacular music of America. During the course of the issue, I implore you to take time to dissect a musician or a group that inspires you. Take the sound back to the ’80s, then the ’20s, and then the 1890′s, and so on as we give you the tools to move further and further into history to find the roots of what it is you love about that music. Moreover, if there is something you are curious about, send us an email at info@revivalistmusic.com and we will try our best to connect you with the resources to find out more. This issue is meant to inspire and educate. We will explore the topics that mean something to the musicians and enthusiasts that dominate the scene today. Look out for collaborations with OkayAfrica and Strut Records as we drive forward with the most exciting interviews, explorations, and discussions spawned from transatlantic jazz beginning on the continent of Africa.
Eric Sandler
Features Editor

lexxdigs:

Issue No. 5: Transatlantic Jazz // Design by Sweden10

Letter from the Editor

The issue of lineage always tends to come up when discussing music. Who played this lick first, where did that technique emerge from, who does he sound like, where does her sound come from. Yet, we tend to have a short term memory when tracing the lineage. Moreover, in America, we also seem to talk about lineage within a geographically small sphere of influence.

Despite the fact that America is a melting pot of cultures, those cultures maintain their own roots and histories scattered throughout the world. One of the largest influences represented in the music we love here at the Revivalist are the various African cultures brought over as early as 1526 as a result of the institutions of slavery. With their influence, jazz, hip-hop, R&B, pop, and many other types of music emerged throughout the Americas, later spreading all over the world.

In Africa, music is closely related to language and communication. With many African languages being tonal, the relationship becomes much closer than the widespread idea of adapting language to music. Music is in fact language. While modern musicians focus a good deal of the rhythms that came from African descent, it is also the melodies and harmonies, the communicative spirit, and the creativity which we seek to explore at the Revivalist.

Throughout these next 2 months we will explore a wide-range of topics from all over the African continent and world to discuss the historical applications, the modern scene, and the wide-ranging influence that gave the basis for the vernacular music of America. During the course of the issue, I implore you to take time to dissect a musician or a group that inspires you. Take the sound back to the ’80s, then the ’20s, and then the 1890′s, and so on as we give you the tools to move further and further into history to find the roots of what it is you love about that music. Moreover, if there is something you are curious about, send us an email at info@revivalistmusic.com and we will try our best to connect you with the resources to find out more. This issue is meant to inspire and educate. We will explore the topics that mean something to the musicians and enthusiasts that dominate the scene today. Look out for collaborations with OkayAfrica and Strut Records as we drive forward with the most exciting interviews, explorations, and discussions spawned from transatlantic jazz beginning on the continent of Africa.

Eric Sandler

Features Editor

Posted on Tuesday, September 30th 2014

Reblogged from LEXX DIGS

Source revivalist.okayplayer.com

lexxdigs:

Analog collage with A Melodias Mexicanas zine feat Hortensia Galvez, May 15 1977. #lofi #melodiasmexicanas #mexicana #cantante #musiczines #roses #collage #analog #sacred #sacredness #vintage #emphemera #succulents

lexxdigs:

Analog collage with A Melodias Mexicanas zine feat Hortensia Galvez, May 15 1977. #lofi #melodiasmexicanas #mexicana #cantante #musiczines #roses #collage #analog #sacred #sacredness #vintage #emphemera #succulents

Posted on Tuesday, September 30th 2014

Reblogged from LEXX DIGS

Hip Hop Queens from Oaxaca to the Bay: 

Witness the hottest and fabulous work of young “Womyn” utilizing Hip Hop as a form of expression and resistance from Oaxaca to the Bay. Featuring special guest artist, Mare Advertencia Lirika, a Zapotec rapper from Oaxaca, Mexico on her 2nd California tour. Chotti Maa and other MC’s, DJ’s and poets also performing. Q+A on “Women Hip Hop in Latin America and Bay Area” follows the show. Hosted by DJ Agana. Follow us on twitter: @mccla415 & instagram: sfmccla for more info. Check out music by Mare Advertencia Lirika:https://soundcloud.com/mare-advertencia-lirika Alas:soundcloud.com/alasmusika Chhoti Maa:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QUrDtD19-pE MADlines:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1qBrSDIMc0w Squinkla:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SLZhjFDP60A Rayreck:www.soundcloud.com/recktracks Documental “Cuando Una Mujer Avanza”http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AvVtDcXC0XU DJ Agana:https://www.youtube.com/user/vanessasolespinoza

Hip Hop Queens from Oaxaca to the Bay:

Witness the hottest and fabulous work of young “Womyn” utilizing Hip Hop as a form of expression and resistance from Oaxaca to the Bay. Featuring special guest artist, Mare Advertencia Lirika, a Zapotec rapper from Oaxaca, Mexico on her 2nd California tour. Chotti Maa and other MC’s, DJ’s and poets also performing. Q+A on “Women Hip Hop in Latin America and Bay Area” follows the show. Hosted by DJ Agana.
Follow us on twitter: @mccla415 & instagram: sfmccla for more info.

Check out music by Mare Advertencia Lirika:
https://soundcloud.com/
mare-advertencia-lirika
Alas:
soundcloud.com/alasmusika
Chhoti Maa:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QUrDtD19-pE
MADlines:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1qBrSDIMc0w
Squinkla:
https://www.youtube.com/
watch?v=SLZhjFDP60A
Rayreck:
www.soundcloud.com/recktracks
Documental “Cuando Una Mujer Avanza”
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AvVtDcXC0XU
DJ Agana:
https://www.youtube.com/user/vanessasolespinoza

Posted on Monday, September 29th 2014

humansofnewyork:

"I’d had five operations on my uterus, and after the last one, the doctor sat me down and told me that I would never have a child. He scheduled a surgery to have my uterus completely removed. I wanted a baby so much, so it was almost like hearing that my life was over. One week later, I started feeling strange. I started craving bread and falling asleep early, but I’ve always had problems with my hormone levels, so I thought it was nothing. My friends would joke that I was pregnant, but it was too hurtful for me to even joke about. Then after three months, I felt so bad that I had to spend a day in bed, and after that my friend drove me to the pharmacy and forced me to take a pregnancy test. I came home and laid the test on the counter without even looking at it. I didn’t want to be let down again. Then right before I went to bed, I finally looked, and there it was. After all these years, I still have that test. One month before they were going to remove my uterus, I’d finally gotten pregnant."
(Mexico City, Mexico)

humansofnewyork:

"I’d had five operations on my uterus, and after the last one, the doctor sat me down and told me that I would never have a child. He scheduled a surgery to have my uterus completely removed. I wanted a baby so much, so it was almost like hearing that my life was over. One week later, I started feeling strange. I started craving bread and falling asleep early, but I’ve always had problems with my hormone levels, so I thought it was nothing. My friends would joke that I was pregnant, but it was too hurtful for me to even joke about. Then after three months, I felt so bad that I had to spend a day in bed, and after that my friend drove me to the pharmacy and forced me to take a pregnancy test. I came home and laid the test on the counter without even looking at it. I didn’t want to be let down again. Then right before I went to bed, I finally looked, and there it was. After all these years, I still have that test. One month before they were going to remove my uterus, I’d finally gotten pregnant."

(Mexico City, Mexico)

Posted on Saturday, September 27th 2014

Reblogged from Humans of New York

Justseeds Collaborations: Melanie Cervantes “Viva La Mujer” cover: Eberhardt Notebook • $8 (large)
Charles at Eberhardt Press in Portland, Oregon worked with Josh MacPhee to put together a small series of blank notebooks featuring Justseeds artists’ work on the covers!
This large blank notebook features “Viva la Mujer” by Melanie Cervantes on the cover.
8”x10” wirebound notebook w/ offset printed cover • 57 blank pages

Justseeds Collaborations: Melanie Cervantes “Viva La Mujer” cover: Eberhardt Notebook • $8 (large)

Charles at Eberhardt Press in Portland, Oregon worked with Josh MacPhee to put together a small series of blank notebooks featuring Justseeds artists’ work on the covers!

This large blank notebook features “Viva la Mujer” by Melanie Cervantes on the cover.

8”x10” wirebound notebook w/ offset printed cover • 57 blank pages

Posted on Friday, September 26th 2014

Source justseeds.org