About the Daughters of D.I.G. (DOD) Project

Daughters of D.I.G.—Developing Intelligent Girls—is an Oakland-based QTPOC tribe, dedicated to passing on the art of digging for knowledge of self through a healing and transformative creative process.

Currently curated by creative Lexx Valdez (lexxdigs.com) and artist/healer Erricka Lewis (thisblackdaffodil.tumblr.com).

Contributing curators:
Devoya Mayo (devoya.tumblr.com) + Valerie Scott (chiefofaffections.tumblr.com)

Founded by Lexx Valdez and Devoya Mayo of thehappyblackgirl.com in 2008 as Daughters of Dilla.

Our message is inspired by the beat of J.Dilla:
"Don't Sell Yourself to Fall in Love"

Taken from the forthcoming album ‘Tayi Bebba’ Available September 8th.

Posted on Tuesday, July 22nd 2014

Reblogged from LEXX DIGS

colinresponse:

daughtersofdig:

robtrujilloart:

daughtersofdig:

"I want to tell you that you all are vessels. I need you to not only clear your throats but clear your minds and hearts too. This is a movement, this is not a moment. I need you to check your egos and leave them out here in the courtyard.

This is not about you. We have thousands of young people in this city who are silenced, whose voices are not heard, whose stories are never told. I want you to be brave.”

Executive Producer of Brave New Voices Hodari Davis giving opening remarks yesterday afternoon to kick off #BNV14.

One of the only teachers in high school that had an effect on me. The voice, the style, and of course the content and heart of what he’s saying I carry with me. Thx for posting Lexx! Love you Mr. Davis!

Thanks for sharing, Rob!

Hodari was a mentor to me in my first job out of college. Huge love and respect to the big homie/Sensei.

Posted on Friday, July 18th 2014

Reblogged from ColinResponse

Source youtube.com

Commit to loving yourself completely. It’s the most radical thing you will do in your lifetime.

Andrea Gibson

Posted on Friday, July 18th 2014

Reblogged from fern and moss

Source murmurrs

dynamicafrica:

"Return of the Rudeboy" Exhibition at Somerset House.

This summer,from mid-June to mid-August, London’s Somerset House is highlighting one Jamaica’s most influential exports on British fashion, music and style.

Birthed on the streets of Kingston, Jamaica, the Rudeboy (or Rudie) came to represent the young rebels who wore distinctively sharp sartorial styles such as Mohair suits, thin ties and pork pie hats. Much of their identity was rooted in aesthetics but their style was also closely connected to the music movements of the time, notably American Jazz and R&B musicians.

Curated by prolific photographer and filmmaker for music’s most wanted Dean Chalkley and fashion-industry favourite creative director Harris Elliott, this interactive exhibition focuses on and highlights the origins of Rudeboy culture in Jamaica, as well as its presence in the United Kingdom through various subcultures, through a series of portraits, installations and set pieces. In the past year, Chalkley and Elliott have photographed over 60 sharply dressed individuals from across the UK, whether it be on the streets of Shoreditch or Savile Row, all of whom embody the essence of what it is to be a Rudeboy (or Rudie) in the 21st century, to document the life, style and attitude of this growing urban group.

In addition to these portraits, all of the individuals pictured have provided their signature playlist, which has been fused along with curators’ and collaborators’ choices, into a soundtrack to capture the spirit and soul of the Rudeboy, and a complimentary sonic addition to the visuals of the exhibition.

And if all that isn’t awesome already, to highlight the essence of grooming as part of the Rudeboy aesthetics, the space will host a pop-up ‘grooming station’ on Thursdays and Saturdays, from Saturday 21 June, where visitors can book appointments to get their hair cut or beard trimmed by a top Rudeboy barber.

Celebrating Rudeboy culture is important for several reasons. Not only is it one of the biggest movements that has largely shaped 20th century British identity, it also highlights some of the impact and contributions that have been made in Britain and the UK at large through the Jamaican diaspora.

13 June – 25 August 2014
Daily 10.00-18.00 (last entry 17.30)
Until 21.00 on Thursday 3 July (last entry 20.30)

Terrace Rooms, South Wing
Free admission

More events.

Posted on Thursday, July 17th 2014

Reblogged from So, I Found This Shiny Object

Source dynamicafrica

robtrujilloart:

daughtersofdig:

"I want to tell you that you all are vessels. I need you to not only clear your throats but clear your minds and hearts too. This is a movement, this is not a moment. I need you to check your egos and leave them out here in the courtyard.

This is not about you. We have thousands of young people in this city who are silenced, whose voices are not heard, whose stories are never told. I want you to be brave.”

Executive Producer of Brave New Voices Hodari Davis giving opening remarks yesterday afternoon to kick off #BNV14.

One of the only teachers in high school that had an effect on me. The voice, the style, and of course the content and heart of what he’s saying I carry with me. Thx for posting Lexx! Love you Mr. Davis!

Thanks for sharing, Rob!

Posted on Thursday, July 17th 2014

Reblogged from Rob/Tres

Source youtube.com

SHARE THIS PLEASE — Searching For African American Illustrators

queensontia:

STILL IN SEARCH OF An African American artist/ illustrator. I need about 25 images drawn for my new website. I would like to buy these images, and use them for promotional purposes, on t-shirts, coffee mugs, etc.

 I would also be happy to give you a spotlight article on the new website once it’s been launched. If you want to find out more information, please send me an email (Because I’m not on TUMBLR MUCH).

 I don’t have a ton of money, but if everything goes well, this could be a permanent gig, being contacted quarterly for more paid jobs when I upgrade material. May also consider working w/ you to complete an upcoming childrens book, depending on how well I like your style.

MUST be a hard worker, and have at least 5 portfolio pictures for me to be able to look over. I’m looking for a poppy, African American, Cultural artist who isn’t afraid of drawing a beautiful black woman, w/ an afro, and w/ an attitude! Someone who can capture the true beauty of an African American Woman, in a comic strip way! ( If that makes any sense at all, lol).

 If that sounds like you….

E-Mail me at TellTia@live.com

SERIOUS INQUIRERS ONLY> This is NOT easy work, I know what I’m looking for, and this WILL be a contracted agreement. PLEASE pass this on to any African American artists that you know, and know that they do NOT have to professional artists to email me. I think that amateur artists are just as important.

Posted on Thursday, July 17th 2014

Reblogged from Sontia's World!